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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
today also included plans for a free-trade agreement between the eu and the u.s. kerry also took time out of his schedule to meet with young people in the german capital. >> security lock down as john kerry returned to the city he once called home. the first stop on the visit was for a chat with young berliners. discussions of a different kind with the chancellor. high on their agenda -- foreign policy and the economy, but first these comments on the relationship with the u.s. >> i record a great deal of importance to transatlantic ties. we do not just have common values. we also face common tasks. >> a number of these challenges were discussed at an earlier meeting with kerry's german counterpart. first and foremost, the plans for a new free trade deal between the u.s. and europe. >> germany is our largest trade partner in europe, and we want to see even more trade and investment that will create jobs -- jobs for -- jobs for germans, for americans, for all europeans. >> negotiations are set to begin within months, and i of the two sides managed to overcome their differences, could be
competition and openness in the markets. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can reall
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
in place which is as per our constitution. that has 60 to 0eu9 days to run that election so the incumbents are not able to influence the outcome and we are on time and on course for that. >> sit having any effect on the peace process [inaudible] >> i mean as i said, they are running its peace process. pakistan is running pakistan right now. but we will certainly assist in the peace process and required. the foreign office will remain engaged. all the centers through the election, i think everybody will remain engaged. we are now two months into a run up but we are constantly engaged in this process so i don't see it becoming a victim of our election. at the end of the day it is a peace process. >> i just wanted to first follow up a little bit on jonathan's question if i could get to you clarify a little bit. the afghans and the americans have complained that thus far those who have been released have been very low down on the list of what they've been asking for and they haven't been released as requested directly to the h.b.c. but have just been released. you said that when asked about br
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
-year investigation that has been going on in the eu and to its search business there, the dominance of the google search engine. also helping the stock move higher today, brooke, wireless carriers activating a million android devices per day, giving apple a run for its money. >> good for those folks who got in when getting was good in '04. alison kosik, thank you. >>> broad picture, let's talk to jill schlessinger. jill, i knew i liked you. i was reading a piece today where you quoted the grateful dead in talking about the ups and downs of the dow jones. give me that line. >> it has been a long, strange trip. come on, now. just think about this, in the summer of 2007, we first crossed 14,000. and that was well before anyone really, the broad public understood we're about to become sucked into the precipice of disaster by the financial sector. so, of course, 14,000 doesn't feel quite as good this time around and frankly a lot of retail investors have not yet gotten back into the market after these last five or six bruising years, who could blame them. it has been agonizing. >> but, here's my debbi
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
financial crisis, the fee future of the eu and the eurozone as well as developments happening in north africa. then as he moves across into the gulf where he'll talk in turkey and to leading gulf nations there, the topics are likely to be syria and also what's happening with respect to iran. there's a very important negotiating meeting this week where the so-called p-5 plus 1 lead negotiators will get together with iranian officials and see if something can be negotiated on iran's nuclear program. >> p.j., i want to ask you also what yesterday was. it marked bradley manning's 1,000th day in custody without a trial. he of course the army private accused of leaking the classified materials to wick leaks. you left the state department after getting in a little bit of hot water after saying the pentagon was treating manning unfairly. three years later, what are your thoughts on him now? >> for a caveat, the formal trial has not begun, but there is a legal proceeding under way, you know, regarding the charges and a potential, you know, plea-bargain. so this is a very open and transparent le
u.s. emissions are actually down, i think it is 8%. eu emissions are down like 9%. but chinese emissions are up 30%. look at, look at where the coal is being burned. i think in five years india is supposed to become the second largest burner of coal right behind china. so the global picture on emissions is, if the national one wasn't enough to make you cry, i mean, just sort of think globally as sort of where we're going, you know? so, that's the crying part. and you asked me bright spots so. i mean there actually are, there actually are some, relax, i mean, the news, car standards that were just promulgated will double fuel economy by 2020 five. california is moving ahead and i think is a real bright spot. rggi is strengthening their targets. that's a bright spot. the cap-and-trade in australia looks like, i mean, who knows, another government might fall over their program here but it's a bright spot. they have got a plan. they have got a program. south korea is thinking about instituting emissions trading. china has seven sort of experiments around the country looking at emis
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)